Why We Do It

United States Government

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

 


The ADA requires that title II entities (State and local governments) and title III entities (businesses and nonprofit organizations that serve the public) communicate effectively with people who have communication disabilities. The goal is to ensure that communication with people with these disabilities is equally effective as communication with people without disabilities.

This publication is designed to help title II and title III entities (“covered entities”) understand how the rules for effective communication, including rules that went into effect on March 15, 2011, apply to them.

The purpose of the effective communication rules is to ensure that the person with a vision, hearing, or speech disability can communicate with, receive information from, and convey information to, the covered entity.


Covered entities must provide auxiliary aids and services when needed to communicate effectively with people who have communication disabilities.


The key to communicating effectively is to consider the nature, length, complexity, and context of the communication and the person’s normal method(s) of communication.


The rules apply to communicating with the person who is receiving the covered entity’s goods or services as well as with that person’s parent, spouse, or companion in appropriate circumstances.

The ADA uses the term “auxiliary aids and services” (“aids and services”) to refer to the ways to communicate with people who have communication disabilities.


For people who are deaf, have hearing loss, or are deaf-blind, this includes providing a qualified notetaker; a qualified sign language interpreter, oral interpreter, cued-speech interpreter, or tactile interpreter; real-time captioning; written materials; or a printed script of a stock speech (such as given on a museum or historic house tour). A “qualified” interpreter means someone who is able to interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively (i.e., understanding what the person with the disability is saying) and expressively (i.e., having the skill needed to convey information back to that person) using any necessary specialized vocabulary.

Real-time captioning (also known as computer-assisted real-time transcription, or CART) is a service similar to court reporting in which a transcriber types what is being said at a meeting or event into a computer that projects the words onto a screen. This service, which can be provided on-site or remotely, is particularly useful for people who are deaf or have hearing loss but do not use sign language.

The free nationwide telecommunications relay service (TRS), reached by calling 7-1-1, uses communications assistants (also called CAs or relay operators) who serve as intermediaries between people who have hearing or speech disabilities who use a text telephone (TTY) or text messaging and people who use standard voice telephones. The communications assistant tells the telephone user what the other party is typing and types to tell the other party what the telephone user is saying. TRS also provides speech-to-speech transliteration for callers who have speech disabilities.

Video relay service (VRS) is a free, subscriber-based service for people who use sign language and have videophones, smartphones, or computers with video communication capabilities. For outgoing calls, the subscriber contacts the VRS interpreter, who places the call and serves as an intermediary between the subscriber and a person who uses a standard voice telephone. The interpreter tells the telephone user what the subscriber is signing and signs to the subscriber what the telephone user is saying.

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is a fee-based service that uses video conferencing technology to access an off-site interpreter to provide real-time sign language or oral interpreting services for conversations between hearing people and people who are deaf or have hearing loss. The new regulations give covered entities the choice of using VRI or on-site interpreters in situations where either would be effective. VRI can be especially useful in rural areas where on-site interpreters may be difficult to obtain. Additionally, there may be some cost advantages in using VRI in certain circumstances. However, VRI will not be effective in all circumstances.

 

For example, it will not be effective if the person who needs the interpreter has difficulty seeing the screen (either because of vision loss or because he or she cannot be properly positioned to see the screen, because of an injury or other condition). In these circumstances, an on-site interpreter may be required.

If VRI is chosen, all of the following specific performance standards must be met:

  • real-time, full-motion video and audio over a dedicated high-speed, wide-bandwidth video connection or wireless connection that delivers high-quality video images that do not produce lags, choppy, blurry, or grainy images, or irregular pauses in communication;

  • a sharply delineated image that is large enough to display the interpreter’s face, arms, hands, and fingers, and the face, arms, hands, and fingers of the person using sign language, regardless of his or her body position;

  • a clear, audible transmission of voices; and

  • adequate staff training to ensure quick set-up and proper operation.

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

Sign language asl American sign language Miami Orlando new York California new Orleans Chicago interpreting interpreter interpret interpretation deaf hard of hearing deafness

 

 

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